After operating in Canada for hundreds of years, the first Hudson's Bay store outside the country opens today in the Netherlands. Aldi merges its coffee factories in Germany to drive distribution. British conglomerate Reckitt Benckiser is battling the lowest sales growth in its history, but this is not its only problem.




Tuesday, 05 September 2017





Hello, dear reader,

After operating in Canada for hundreds of years, the first Hudson's Bay store outside the country opens today in the Netherlands. Aldi merges its coffee factories in Germany to drive distribution. British conglomerate Reckitt Benckiser is battling the lowest sales growth in its history, but this is not its only problem.




Europe


Expanding overseas ▪ Canada's Hudson's Bay has opened a department store in Amsterdam, with nine more to follow in the next three weeks. Here is what the leaders of the retail conglomerate expect. Fellow Canadian, cafe chain Tim Horton, is on track for the second phase of its extensive roll-out plan in the UK.



Coffee considerations ▪ The Southern unit of German discounter Aldi is merging its coffee factories into one common association, named NewCoffee Roasting Specialists, to exploit potential distribution gains. LZ Retailytics thinks the move was long overdue and that it is an indication of more to come like the listing of coffee brands.



Russian experiments ▪ German hypermarket operator Globus trials a new initiative to link e-commerce with its bricks and mortar business in Russia. The retailer will be launching a click & collect service by end-2017 and plans to start with an assortment of up to 10,000 items, including perishable goods.



Reckitt in trouble ▪ Four top executives are quitting the British household consumer group. Their departure follows a cyber attack that led to a forecast cut in July due to disruptions in manufacturing and distribution. Reckitt Benckiser is in the middle of a restructuring process.




Asia & Australia


Joining forces ▪ Alibaba and Tokyo-based convenience store chain Lawson are teaming up to bridge the language gap and will sell online tickets to Chinese tourists for Japanese leisure activities. Lawson is also equipping its roughly 13,000 stores in Japan to accept Alibaba's Alipay mobile payment service.



Online moves ▪ Australian supermarket majors Coles and Woolworths are ramping up their e-commerce efforts (paywall). The former will open its first online delivery hub in Queensland. Across the Tasman, LazyAs is challenging UberEat with its local delivery service. Running for just under a year, the Kiwi start-up is about to reach a turnover of NZ$ 1 million.


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USA & Canada


Canadian pilot ▪ Amazon will trial its one- and two-hour membership delivery service in Toronto and Vancouver. The move marks a broader push into the Canadian market for the online powerhouse and leverages its recent acquisition of Whole Foods, which has 13 stores in Canada.



Export push ▪ In an effort to increase the traceability of supplies and make beef shipments more attractive to potential buyers in the US and Asia, Argentina's government will work to promote micro-chip-technology and the accompanying digital tracking.



Sustainability matters ▪ The Brazilian unit of Walmart has teamed up with private label manufacturer Nat Cereais to develop more sustainable production methods through the “Sustentabilidade de Ponta a Ponta” project. The initiative promotes the reduction of negative impact throughout the supply chain.




Insider Insights


Brexit risks ▪ Sainsbury’s CEO Mike Coupe has warned that fresh food could be left rotting at the British border if strict customs controls for EU goods are put in place after Brexit. He is determined to make the voice of the retail sector heard "strongly".



Green flagship ▪ Dorothy Maxwell, Head of Sustainability at House of Fraser, talks about the retailer's new Rushden Lakes store and explains why it has become a hotspot for brands, who wish to showcase their commitment to sustainability and reduce their carbon footprint.