Swiss food giant Nestlé makes another move into promising markets in California, Lidl is set to enter another state in the US, and supermarket major Kroger pilots a restaurant concept. Coop Danmark and US wholesaler Costco are weighing their chances in China, while some British retailers are worried about the uncertainty of Brexit.




Friday, 15 September 2017





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Swiss food giant Nestlé makes another move into promising markets in California, Lidl is set to enter another state in the US, and supermarket major Kroger pilots a restaurant concept. Coop Danmark and US wholesaler Costco are weighing their chances in China, while some British retailers are worried about the uncertainty of Brexit.




USA & Canada


Nestlé continues shopping spree ▪ Blue Bottle Coffee is selling a majority stake to the Swiss food maker. The trendy Californian chain is the latest upscale coffee brand to be swallowed by a big corporation. For Nestlé, it is another move into rapidly expanding niche markets after its recent acquisition of US plant-based food producer Sweet Earth.



Lidl pushes ahead ▪ On Thursday, the German discount powerhouse opened its first store in Georgia, which is the 30th outlet since its entry in June. Now, Lidl is eyeing the next American state and confirmed that it is planning its first location in Alabama, where it is expected to cause a "ripple effect” on area development.



Thinking outside the box ▪ In a bid to 'create a gathering place where our food can be experienced', supermarket major Kroger will open its first-ever full-service restaurant in October. Meanwhile, online start-up and footwear maker Allbirds has opened a physical store in New York. Click here to have a sneak peek.




Asia


Targeting Chinese consumers ▪ Coop Danmark has signed an agreement with e-commerce platform Kaola to sell its upmarket Irma private labels in China, starting with coffee, chocolate, marmalade, personal care products, and kids wear. US wholesale giant Costco has chosen Alibaba's Tmall to launch its flagship store.



Rakuten bets on India ▪ The Japanese internet company plans to double its technology headcount in the country to 600 but said it is not looking at any e-commerce investments. Rakuten was said to be interested in e-commerce marketplace Snapdeal after its buyout by larger rival Flipkart fell through.


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Europe


Uncertainty reigns ▪ Pre-tax profits for the John Lewis partnership fell by 53% during the first six months of the year, despite a 2.3% increase in gross sales across its John Lewis and Waitrose banners. Chairman Charlie Mayfield blames Brexit and says that Britain needs a 'serious parliamentary debate'.



... and positive predictions ▪ Two of Britain’s biggest retailers have signalled some respite for cash-strapped consumers by predicting Brexit-related price rises would come to an end next year. Clothing retailer Next and Morrisons have both issued upbeat forecasts. The supermarket chain continues to show strong growth.



Shake-up at Dunnes ▪ The Irish grocer is undergoing its 'biggest change in more than a generation' as chief executive Margaret Heffernan appoints her daughter and her niece as company directors. This might end speculation about whether the company will be sold or a new generation will take control.




Africa


Investors needed ▪ Over the past decade, big shopping centres have become a regular feature in Nigeria's largest cities, but the country's economic troubles over much of the past two years have slowed the pace of investment. Researchers from Estate Intel think that smaller neighbourhood malls might attract investors.



Finding rules ▪ After two major supermarkets, namely Uchumi and Nakumatt significantly had to scale down operations, the Kenyan government will give players in the retail sector a chance to come up with self-regulations rules as part of the measures to protect the vulnerable sector.