Following in the footsteps of CVS, US health care company McKesson's has made its own play to stay ahead in a rapidly changing industry, with a smart online acquisition. Meanwhile, with China set to eclipse America as its biggest market, coffee king Starbucks has opened an epic new roastery there. Enjoy the read and feel free to share.




Wednesday, 06 December 2017





Hello ,

Following in the footsteps of CVS, US health care company McKesson's has made its own play to stay ahead in a rapidly changing industry, with a smart online acquisition. Meanwhile, with China set to eclipse America as its biggest market, coffee king Starbucks has opened an epic new roastery there. Enjoy the read and feel free to share.

ADVERTISEMENT
Banner





USA & Canada


Strategic moves ▪ Health care company McKesson’s Canadian offshoot has shored up its digital capabilities with the purchase of online wellness retailer Well.ca. Discount giant Walmart will integrate its physical and e-commerce units in Brazil, under the US$ 464 million in new initiatives it plans to spend there.



Strained global relations ▪ A court of appeal in the US has revived a lawsuit over Chinese retailer Alibaba’s IPO, accusing it of defrauding shareholders by hiding a regulatory warning regarding counterfeiters. Soft drink giant PepsiCo is fending off claims of cyber espionage levelled at it by the Russian government.



Food fight ▪ McDonalds has escalated the pricing war between fast food titans with the launch of its new value-priced menu, replacing its less profitable US$ 1 menu. Rival Pizza Hut is looking beyond price, piloting a service that delivers cold beer with food orders. It plans to add wine in January.




Asia


China or bust ▪ Coffee giant Starbucks has reaffirmed ambitions for its fastest growing market, with the opening of its largest ever café in Shanghai. The 30,000 sq foot roastery boasts all the bells and whistles including an augmented reality experience, built in partnership with tech giant Alibaba.



Asian ambitions ▪ French hypermarket chain Carrefour is continuing with its expansion plans in Taiwan, adding four new stores in the space of a week. Japanese household manufacturer Iris Ohyama will spend US$ 314 million by 2019 to boost production capacity overseas as it looks to meet online demand.



Diversity first ▪ Sportswear leader Nike has launched the world’s first sports hijab. The design will be rolled out internationally following months of anticipation, after being tested by US champion fencer Ibtihaj Muhammad.




Europe


Bankruptcy aftermath ▪ Fallout from the Palmer and Harvey collapse continues, with the company criticised for shareholder and director payments worth GBP 70 million over 10 years. Meanwhile, retailer Nisa will help member McColl’s to ensure continuity of supplies following P&H’s downfall.



Green shoots ▪ Britain’s ‘Big Four’ grocers enjoyed a resurgence on the FTSE 100 lead by Tesco, on the back of easing inflation hopes. McColl's cracked GBP 1 billion in sales for the first time, despite a Q4 slowdown, helped along by its acquisition of 298 Co-Op stores.



Moving homes ▪ Struggling Croatian retailer Agrokor will move its headquarters in Zagreb to the south-eastern part of the capital. The move, to ‘better manage available office space’, reflects significant downsizing of staff numbers, almost half what it was at the beginning of the year.




Thought provoking reads


Thinking laterally ▪ Owners are re-thinking the traditional concept of the mall in order to survive. Wielding plenty of empty space, ample parking, and access to major thoroughfares, one revolutionary idea is to add residential housing to repurposing plans.



Man or machine ▪ There are now 170,000 fewer retail jobs in America, but 75,000 more Amazon robots. New analysis suggests that despite the e-commerce giant being one of the country’s biggest employers, machines could represent 20% of the employee base by the end of the year.