Although Britain's Tesco performed remarkably well over the festive season, German discounter duo Aldi and Lidl remain the UK's fastest growing retailers. JD.com is set to woo Chinese consumers with French products and US powerhouse Target puts pressure on its rival with stellar Christmas results. Enjoy the read!




Wednesday, 10 January 2018





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Although Britain's Tesco performed remarkably well over the festive season, German discounter duo Aldi and Lidl remain the UK's fastest growing retailers. JD.com is set to woo Chinese consumers with French products and US powerhouse Target puts pressure on its rival with stellar Christmas results. Enjoy the read!




Asia


French deal ▪ JD.com is determined to sell EUR 2 billion of French goods to Chinese consumers and has signed an agreement with France's Fives Group to buy some of its warehouse technology. The e-commerce major is also setting up a new research and development centre in China.



Vietnamese records ▪ Retail sales in the Southeast Asian country grew by a whopping 10.9% in 2017 to US$ 129.6 billion, spurred by a rising middle class and an influx of overseas retailers, one of them being Swedish fashion icon Hennes & Mauritz, which arrived four months ago and is about to open its third store in the country.



Indian competition ▪ Another entrant has joined Amazon and local rival Flipkart in the battle for online dominance in India. Mumbai-based Allcargo Logistics, one of the country's largest logistics providers, plans to transform itself into a business-to-customer company with a focus on e-commerce.




USA & Mexico


In top form ▪ Target emerged as a winner in the US retail holiday season, boosting its turnaround plan. Following its acquisition of delivery service Shipt, the discounter is ending its partnership with Instacart and has also announced the launch of a new jeanswear line for women.



Losing steam ▪ After two consecutive years of double-digit growth, Walmex reported that sales slowed in 2017. The Walmart-unit posted a 7.7% rise in sales to US$ 29.6 billion, its smallest growth rate since 2014, claiming a weaker peso against the US dollar and a jump in gasoline prices



Charging suppliers ▪ Whole Foods Market has begun to ask suppliers to pay for in-store services such as displays and demos. In addition, the chain is requiring its vendors to work exclusively with a Connecticut-based brokerage firm to set up displays and check shelf conditions.




Europe


Turnaround struggles ▪ British grocer Asda continues to cut staff at its head office to get "fit for the future". Agrokor's proposed reorganisation plan received the nod from its creditors. The troubled Croatian conglomerate has closed two of its flagship stores and is considering exiting Bosnia and Herzegovina.



Festive splurge ▪ Tesco was the best performing grocer over the crucial Christmas period with a 3.1% rise in sales according to latest figures. However, Aldi and Lidl share the title of Britain's fastest growing retailers with both discounters managing double-digit growth rates in the same time.



Irish obstacles ▪ Aldi has accused its rivals in Ireland of “denying consumers access to choice and competition," as a number of its plans for new stores have been subject to objection, mainly by competitor Tesco, which has objected to 16 separate developments proposed by the German discounter.




Unusual and remarkable


Consumer cooperative ▪ Bologna is set to become the first city in Italy to have a supermarket managed and run entirely by its customers. The Camilla community emporium will be run by volunteers who will also act as the business' partners and launched as soon as the target of 300 partners is reached.



Digital currency ▪ Eastman Kodak has become the latest company to jump on the cryptocurrency bandwagon. The one-time leader in photography is launching a 'Kodakcoin' for photographers, part of 'Kodakone', an image rights management platform in a licensing partnership with WENN Digital.