Italian brand Eataly will open its first food hall in London in 2020 and Matthew Barnes, CEO of Aldi UK, has been promoted to the top rank in the Aldi Sued empire. JD.com posted results, rival Alibaba made a major investment in an Indian start-up and Amazon has the French grocery market in its sights. Have a great start into the new week.




Monday, 05 March 2018





Hello ,

Italian brand Eataly will open its first food hall in London in 2020 and Matthew Barnes, CEO of Aldi UK, has been promoted to the top rank in the Aldi Sued empire. JD.com posted results, rival Alibaba made a major investment in an Indian start-up and Amazon has the French grocery market in its sights. Have a great start into the new week.

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Europe


Management reshuffle ▪ Aldi has appointed Giles Hurley the new chief executive for its British and Irish operations as the current boss, Matthew Barnes, is promoted to an expanded role within the German parent company. Aldi veteran Barnes is credited with overseeing the discounter’s dramatic rise in the UK.



Eataly enters Britain ▪ The Italian food hall brand, which combines restaurants, marketplaces and bars under one roof, has partnered with British Land to open its first UK store at a location in London. Eataly was founded in 2004 and currently operates 35 megastores across the world.



Offering a lifeline ▪ Dixons Carphone appears to have stepped in to offer employees of rival electronics retailer Maplin, which filed for administration, the possibility of a new job. In Ireland, however, its mobile phone chain Carphone Warehouse is to significantly scale back its store network.



Fragile position ▪ Hungarian retail cooperative CBA is continuing to divest of individual stores to multinational operators such as Lidl, Aldi and Auchan. LZ Retailytics reckons that the tide has turned against small shop owners and coops in Hungary and that they will successively lose market presence.




Asia


Dip in the red ▪ JD.com reported a bigger-than-expected loss and predicted slow profit margin growth in 2018 amid its fierce battle with Alibaba and Amazon. The Beijing-based online major is undertaking an ambitious spending campaign to become a global e-commerce power.



Pushing ahead ▪ Alibaba has made a major funding commitment to India-based food delivery specialist Zomato, valuing the start-up at US$ 1 billion. The Chinese e-tailer has also set up its first joint research centre in Singapore with Nanyang University to investigate artificial intelligence.



Adding another brand ▪ Chinese investment giant Fosun continues its shopping spree with the purchase of a majority stake in Austrian legwear company Wolford, which struggles with its turnaround process. Fosun recently bought French luxury label Lanvin.




US & Canada


Department store allies ▪ J.C. Penney, which missed the estimates for Q4, is investing in beauty to fuel its turnaround. The company plans to expand hair salon business and bets on its partnership with Sephora. Meanwhile, fellow retailer Neiman Marcus partnered with rapper Lil Wayne to attract a youthful audience.



Online move ▪ Canadian women's fashion retailer Reitmans is closing all of its 17 Hyba stores by next February. The Montreal-based company plans to move the brand into its existing 270 Reitmans stores and online. Hyba sells activewear clothes such as yoga wear and running gear.




What to watch


Amazon in France ▪ The e-commerce giant aims to launch its grocery delivery service in France, its French boss revealed. The country's government is welcoming the giant and French finance minister Bruno Le Maire thinks that the expected EU tax proposal for global companies will be closer to 2% than to 6%.



Voice control on the rise ▪ Shopping through voice-activated devices such as Amazon Echo and Google Home is set to become the next disruptive force in retail. According to new research from OC&C Strategy Consultants, US$ 40 billion will be spent through voice commerce across the US and the UK by 2022.