President Trump continues to put Amazon under pressure, while retail giant Kroger faces serious competition from Whole Foods in the home delivery sector. On the other side of the Pacific, Alibaba is taking full control of Ele.me and also invests in India. In Germany, Aldi is entering the price battle in the drugstore sector. Enjoy the read.




Tuesday, 03 April 2018





Hello ,

President Trump continues to put Amazon under pressure, while retail giant Kroger faces serious competition from Whole Foods in the home delivery sector. On the other side of the Pacific, Alibaba is taking full control of Ele.me and also invests in India. In Germany, Aldi is entering the price battle in the drugstore sector. Enjoy the read.




US & Canada


Calculated attack ▪ President Donald Trump is carrying on with his assault on Amazon, claiming the retailer is getting unjustly cheap rates from the US postal service, and that it does not pay its fair share of tax. Amazon stocks continue to fall following Trump’s condemnations.



Social responsibility ▪ Walmart has committed to reducing its carbon emissions from its Chinese operations. The 50 million metric tonne target is set to be reached by 2030. The big box retailer also launched its 2018 “Fight Hunger. Spark Change” campaign and has increased its support of food banks and the 'Feeding America' network.



Price check ▪ Whole Foods is out pricing supermarket chain Kroger for home delivered groceries in Cincinnati, by 2-7% or US$ 35 to US$ 50, according to Barclays analysts. However, the Cincinnati headquartered retailer remains cheaper for customers who shop in-store.




Europe


Entering the battle ▪ Aldi Nord and Süd are to offer discounts on branded products for the first time in Germany. The promotion is regarded as a move to highlight its expanded drugstore assortment. LZ Retailytics says it is interesting that the discounter has finally entered the war on price in the drugstore sector.



Sensible split ▪ UK bank Barclays has undergone a major restructure to become the first British bank to split up its investment lending from its retail loans. The move comes as part of new regulations designed to protect consumers in the event of another financial crisis.



Bold bottle move ▪ UK supermarket Co-op has released plans to scrap the clear plastic packaging of its water bottles, instead opting to use materials made from 50% recycled matter. The new packaging will have a cloudy appearance and if successful with consumers could reduce waste by 350 tonnes per year.




Asia & Australasia


Mouth-watering investment ▪ Alibaba has confirmed it will buy the remaining shares for Ele.me that is doesn’t already own. The takeover of China’s largest online food delivery platform is said to be valued at US$9.5 billion. The e-commerce behemoth is also increasing its investment in Indian e-tailer Paytm.



High tech in China ▪ Walmart has opened its first small high-tech supermarket in China, where smartphones can be used to pay for items that are mostly available on the US retailer’s store on Chinese online marketplace JD.com. The outlet will stock more than 8,000 items.



Food security ▪ Proposed changes to Australia’s bio-security laws threaten the future of its organic fruit and vegetable industry. A compulsory fungicidal treatment is being recommended on a range of imported seeds, meaning the seeds would no longer be labelled organic and could hurt food growers and sellers.




Tantalizing Tidbits


April Fools ▪ Many US retailers used April 1 to collaborate together for a series of marketing stunts disguised as clever pranks. One such coupling saw fast food chain Arby’s combine with eyeglass manufacturer Warby Parker to make onion ring monocles that customers could actually purchase in New York.



Cultural commodity ▪ Thousands of people gathered in Toronto for the opening of Jollibee, a fast food outlet hailed as the “McDonald’s of the Philippines”. Filipinos full of nostalgia (and burger steaks covered in gravy) were delighted to celebrate food that hails from their homeland.