Amazon deepens its rift with fellow technology titan Google and signals a possible shift into online advertising following its decision to stop buying prized Google ads. Meanwhile, Carrefour is implementing ambitious plans in Poland to provide organic produce to consumers, and Walmart may seek to make India’s Flipkart public. Enjoy the read.




Monday, 14 May 2018





Hello ,

Amazon deepens its rift with fellow technology titan Google and signals a possible shift into online advertising following its decision to stop buying prized Google ads. Meanwhile, Carrefour is implementing ambitious plans in Poland to provide organic produce to consumers, and Walmart may seek to make India’s Flipkart public. Enjoy the read.




America


Big deal ▪ Walmart has indicated it is looking to take Indian e-commerce major Flipkart public in four years, according to a filing report with a US regulator. The deal still awaits authorisation from India’s anti-trust regulator and is likely to close later this year.



Ambitious plans ▪ Amazon has quietly retreated from buying a popular type of Google advertising, with commentators suggesting the shift may be a sign the company is hastening its own digital ad plans. The online giant is also working to make its voice assistant Alexa more beneficial in the healthcare sector, and is hot on Apple’s heels to be the first American company to reach USD 1 trillion.




Europe


Supermarket dealings ▪ The proposed GBP 12 billion merger between Asda and Sainsbury’s could see 73 supermarkets sold, according to research by Maximise UK. The firm specialises in ascertaining the best locations for stores, and estimates 6% of the stores to be in jeopardy. Meanwhile, Tesco chief Dave Lewis’s pay packet has increased by 17.5% to GBP 4.9 million.



Progressive produce ▪ Carrefour Poland is going green with its new Food Transition policy. The French multinational retailer plans to provide Polish customers with a constant supply of verifiable, organic foods, and has signed contracts with seven local farmers to kick-start the scheme.



Acquisitions abound ▪ Norwegian sportswear icon Helly Hansen has been sold to the Canadian Tire Corporation in a deal worth USD 771 million, with current CEO Paul Stoneham expected to remain on. Across the channel, UK retailer The Co-operative has finalised its purchase of convenience store chain Nisa.




Australasia & Asia


Human rights ▪ It will soon be compulsory for large Australian retailers to report on modern slavery, in accordance with new government regulations. Businesses turning over more than AUS 100 million will be required to address slavery, trafficking and forced labour all the way up their supply chain.



Wardrobe newsflash ▪ Australian clothing retailer Noni B is set to acquire 832 new stores as part of a AUS 31 million deal with Speciality Fashion Group. Across the Tasman, the New Zealand Commerce Commission has launched an inquiry into local clothing brand 'World' after several complaints were laid about its ‘Made in NZ’ assertions.



Quick cuisine ▪ Transport provider Grab Vietnam is expanding its services to include food delivery, with the launch of GrabFood in Ho Chi Minh City. Customers will be able to order food from local restaurants that have signed up with the new app.




Talking technology


Smart experience ▪ Model homes have been set up across the US for people to trial Amazon’s ‘Alexa’ in the domestic sphere. Customers can experience using the voice aide to perform tasks such as turning on appliances, ordering food and dimming the lights. Meanwhile, check out what it’s really like inside the till-free, techno-savvy Amazon Go.



Camera chaos ▪ While face recognition technology has long been used by retailers worldwide to reduce crime, it is causing a stir in New Zealand after a man was misidentified as a shoplifter. The case has been referred to the privacy commissioner amid concerns over the use of covert surveillance.