While some retailers have cause for celebration, others have darker days in store. A 60th birthday present has come for the US-fast-food company IHOP in the form of a new delivery deal, but rival McDonald‘s has seen an ongoing lawsuit get dragged out even further. Across the Atlantic, the boss of Premier Foods has survived a narrow protest vote, while ailing Poundworld continues to see stores close and jobs vanish. Enjoy the read, and don't forget to share.




Thursday, 19 July 2018





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While some retailers have cause for celebration, others have darker days in store. A 60th birthday present has come for the US-fast-food company IHOP in the form of a new delivery deal, but rival McDonald‘s has seen an ongoing lawsuit get dragged out even further. Across the Atlantic, the boss of Premier Foods has survived a narrow protest vote, while ailing Poundworld continues to see stores close and jobs vanish. Enjoy the read, and don't forget to share.




US & Canada


Cups and courtrooms ▪ A judge has rejected McDonald‘s proposed settlement on a case on whether the fast food giant is accountable for alleged labour law violations by franchisees. The company has also teamed up with Starbucks to focus on the joint creation of a more sustainable cup, with both companies committing USD 5 million to the project.



Best of times, worst of times ▪ Amazon's weeklong sales event has proved prime time for competitors too, with Target announcing that July 17th brought its greatest online footfall this year. News is gloomier for Los Angeles-based meal kit provider Chef’d, which despite recent expansions, has now reportedly ceased operations after running out of funding.



Special occassions ▪ Online grocer FreshDirect has been lauded for its commitment to the Bronx at the opening of a new 400,000 square foot facility in the borough, which offers subsidised meals and groceries for employees. Restaurant chain IHOP has seen its 60th birthday coincide with a new delivery partnership with DoorDash, extending home delivery to 300 stores.




Europe


Trouble ahead ▪ Discounter Poundworld, which collapsed in June, will see another 40 stores close as part of its administration process, with 531 employees to lose their jobs, as a potential buyer remains nowhere in sight. A report has found that price rises after Brexit could see everyday dairy products become luxury items in Britain.



Holding out ▪ Despite a rocky 41% protest vote against his re-election, Premiers Foods chief executive Gavin Darby will stay on as head of the British food manufacturer. On the continent, JAB and Nestlé are among firms expressing an interest in family-owned Trieste-based coffee roaster Illy Coffee, which has so far rejected all approaches.



Silence is golden ▪ Morrisons is to introduce a 'Quieter Hour' in stores, in order to help customers with autism and other conditions. The initiative, which will run 9am to 10am Saturdays, will see stores make measures to reduce sensory disruptions for customers struggling with the stimuli associated with supermarket shopping.




Asia & Australia


Legal lightning? ▪ Questions have been raised as to whether Amazon's 'lightning deals', which were launched as part of its Prime Day special and see items heavily discounted for short periods, fall within Australian regulations, under which retailers must advertise goods in quantities and for lengths of time deemed 'reasonable'.



Mickey and Mongolia ▪ A partnership between David Jones and Walt Disney will see the development of a new area featuring interactive merchandise displays on the top floor of the Australian department store's Sydney flagship as part of its AUD 200 million renovation. Korean discounter Lotte Mart is set to launch a store in the Mongolian capital of Ulaanbaatar next year.



Ditching drinks ▪ Coke Zero will be removed from Australian shelves by September and replaced with Coca Cola No Sugar, amid growing calls Down Under for the implementation of a sugar tax. Seven Eleven Japan says it has scrapped plans to sell draft beer after huge reactions on social media led to fears of excess demand.




Food and drink


Wrong country ▪ Woolworths has claimed its butter as Australian despite the dairy product actually being from across the Tasman. While the grocer's Essential Salted Butter is described on its website as 'Australian made', the labeling on the back of the butter lists it as a 'product of New Zealand'.



More than just water ▪ Growing health-consciousness has seen consumers increasingly reach for water over sugary drinks, and some companies are getting creative in order to reap the benefits. Click here to see some of the more unusual twists on bottled water, ranging from hints of caffeine to recyclable cartons.