In the battle for positive public perception Walmart has trumped Amazon today, with the former close to fulfilling its ambitious target of hiring 250,000 war veterans, and the latter taking heat for a bizarre Twitter army seemingly paid to promote the stellar working conditions in its notorious warehouses. Enjoy the read and have a great week.




Monday, 27 August 2018





Hello ,

In the battle for positive public perception Walmart has trumped Amazon today, with the former close to fulfilling its ambitious target of hiring 250,000 war veterans, and the latter taking heat for a bizarre Twitter army seemingly paid to promote the stellar working conditions in its notorious warehouses. Enjoy the read and have a great week.




Europe


Turbulent times ▪ The proposed deal for the Irish Henderson family to buy Poundworld out of administration has reportedly fallen through. Frozen food discounter Iceland now has agreed to take over 19 stores from the British variety chain. Poundworld went bankrupt in June and closed the last of its 335 stores earlier this month.



Fresh starts ▪ Dutch supermarket chain Albert Heijn has unveiled a pilot vegan counter at its flagship Amsterdam store, stocking an extensive range of meat-free convenience foods. Meanwhile, street-wear icon Stüssy will return to London after its departure nine years ago.



Leadership appointments ▪ Spanish discounter DIA enjoyed a sharp rise in its shares with the announcement of Antonio Coto as the new CEO and a refreshed strategy to reverse the company’s fortunes. Dutch retailer Plus also revealed a new leader, with Duncan Hoy taking up the helm.




The Americas


Under fire ▪ The legitimacy of 14 Twitter accounts who repeatedly endorse outstanding working conditions in Amazon's controversial warehouses have been called into question. The online behemoth if also copping flak for failing to remove Nazi memorabilia from its platform after it promised to do so.



Promise kept ▪ Walmart is making good on its pledge to hire 250,000 war veterans by 2020. The retail giant has officially hired 206,000 returned service men and women, making them 80% of the way to reaching their goal. The program aims to ease the sometimes-difficult transition from active duty to civilian life.



Controversy afoot ▪ Gap's shares have plummeted following an unexpected drop in quarterly sales of its namesake brand. The San Francisco-based clothing retailer has unveiled an ad campaign featuring a young girl wearing a hijab, and while it has been positively received in the US, it has been slammed in France.



Trade trouble ▪ The Mexican government is on the hunt for small-medium sized businesses to sell wholesale goods such as avocados and tequila through Alibaba, as part of the partnership struck last year between the e-commerce giant and Mexico. Only 24 companies have been approved for export so far.




Asia


Wine woes ▪ China has invested a significant amount into developing its viticulture, but is yet to reap the benefits. While its vineyards are operational and its cultivation of grapes is expanding, the wineries are struggling to make any headway against established global players.



Asian expansion ▪ Indian leather retailer Hidesign is preparing to increase its presence throughout Asia with plans to open flagship stores in Singapore and Indonesia. The company intends to extend its luxury clothing line made from ostrich and deer leather, items which retail from USD 430 apiece.




Behind the scenes


Sneak peek ▪ Target is continuing its trend of opening small-format stores that are responsive to the communities around them. Check out this image gallery which showcases the prep-work undertaken by the US retailer for its new store opening in Philadelphia.



Novel approach ▪ Bookseller Barnes & Noble have had a notoriously bad run of employing chief executives, with just over five appointments in six years. This time around, its peers in the book world are helping out with the launch of a global poll asking for votes on its picks for CEO candidates as well as write-in suggestions.