To get orders as quickly as possible to customers is one of the main challenges in this day and age. Sweden's Ikea is set to use electric cars in five major cities to achieve this goal. Jet.com promises a 'city grocery experience' in New York, and its parent company Walmart invests in delivery services across the globe. Enjoy the read and have a relaxing weekend.




Friday, 14 September 2018





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To get orders as quickly as possible to customers is one of the main challenges in this day and age. Sweden's Ikea is set to use electric cars in five major cities to achieve this goal. Jet.com promises a 'city grocery experience' in New York, and its parent company Walmart invests in delivery services across the globe. Enjoy the read and have a relaxing weekend.




The Americas


Raising the stakes ▪ Walmart is ramping up its grocery delivery business on the international stage. In Mexico, the retailer has reached a deal to buy Latin American food delivery service Cornershop. In Canada, it has teamed up with Instacart to bring some Canadian customers same-day grocery deliveries.



Targeting urban shoppers ▪ While parent company Walmart is actively investing outside the United States, e-commerce subsidiary Jet.com has unveiled a relaunch of its platform at home, with an upgraded look and a stronger focus on serving the needs of New Yorkers, providing them with a 'city grocery experience'.



Snack deal ▪ Confectionary giant Hershey has announced to acquire cheese puffs maker Pirate Brands, owned by B&G Foods, in an all-cash deal worth USD 420 million. The deal is expected to add to Hershey's financial targets as it delves into the more than USD 2.5 billion cheese puffs market.



Investors disappointed ▪ Supermarket giant Kroger missed analysts' estimates with its quarterly results, sending its shares down. Sears reported the smallest sales decline for the quarter in more than three years, but its losses widened, as the embattled department store operator continues to close stores.




Europe


Focus on wholesale ▪ German retailer Metro plans to sell its struggling Real hypermarkets. CEO Olaf Koch aims to focus the once-sprawling conglomerate on its core cash-and-carry business and has already sold its Kaufhof department stores and split from consumer electronics retailer Ceconomy.



Electricity issues ▪ Swedish furniture chain Ikea is set to use electric vehicles for all its home deliveries in five major cities by 2020. Meanwhile, French supermarket chain Leclerc enters the residential power market, selling electricity to French households, offering a discount of at least 10% to regulated prices.



Profit collapse ▪ The John Lewis Partnership, which owns a number of department stores and the Waitrose supermarket chain in Britain, has reported a 98.8 % plunge in first-half profits to GBP 1.2 million, blaming challenging times in retail. Despite the lousy numbers, some insiders think there is no reason to worry.




Asia


Tech in the opera ▪ Samsung has opened its largest store worldwide in a former opera house in Bangalore, India. It took the South Korean tech giant two years to restore the colonial structure. Besides buying the devices, visitors will also be offered to taking part in workshops and other events.




Weekend reads


Store density ▪ Is there a decline of physical stores in the age of e-commerce? LZ Retailytics looks at the sales density of physical grocery channels across 40 European markets in search of a decline in terms of retail sales per square metre. Click here for a free report.



Future flagships ▪ Formerly the pride and glory of any retailer, the classic flagship store is about to change, giving way to high-spec concept stores. To analyse what the future has in store, British magazine Retail Gazette put the question to various experts to see how the new flagships will operate.