Selling toys, home goods and other products marks Amazon's latest push into the brick-and-mortar space. Russian retailer Magnit turns to smaller shops, Poland's Eurocash invests in an online platform, and a Chicago start-up wants to make eating healthy food as easy as getting money out of the teller. Sounds too good to be true. Enjoy the read!




Thursday, 27 September 2018





Hello ,

Selling toys, home goods and other products marks Amazon's latest push into the brick-and-mortar space. Russian retailer Magnit turns to smaller shops, Poland's Eurocash invests in an online platform, and a Chicago start-up wants to make eating healthy food as easy as getting money out of the teller. Sounds too good to be true. Enjoy the read!




Europe


Challenges ahead ▪ After the sudden departure of its former boss, Aldi Nord has appointed Torsten Hufnagel (paywall, in German) as CEO. He is now in charge to oversee the modernisation process. LZ Retailytics takes a closer look at the 'supermarketisation' of the German discount giant. Click here to get the latest report.



Business revamps ▪ Moving away from hypermarkets, Russian retailer Magnit plans to nearly double its number of convenience stores by 2023 and increase its market share to 15%. In Poland, wholesaler Eurocash is set to invest millions in an online platform, that will ‘change the lives of grocery store owners’.



Going public ▪ The Sonae conglomerate plans to publicly list its food retail business, which is one of the largest grocers in the country. In neighbouring Spain, discounter Dia has lost more than two-thirds of its market value since 2015 as its struggles with rivals Lidl and Mercadona.




US & Latin America


Physical push ▪ Amazon has opened a general store in New York, selling a range of products that were highly rated on its website. The online giant also powers ahead with its same-day grocery delivery from Whole foods, adding more cities, and has invested in a start-up, which focuses on prefabricated houses.



Chilean approval ▪ Walmart has been given the green light to build a distribution centre in Santiago de Chile with an investment of USD 180 million. The project has been met with resistance by some locals. Walmart Chile operates 380 stores in the South American country.



Burger tweaks ▪ McDonald's has announced that it has cut artificial preservatives and flavours from all of its classic burgers. The fast-food major is also facing changes in its executive team as its chief restaurant officer will retire at the end of the year.




Asia & Australasia


Global ambitions ▪ Chinese tech giants Alibaba and Tencent have both launched money-transfer services in Hong Kong recently. The moves are regarded as steps to be part of the global remittance business, worth USD 600 billion, and to take popular mobile payments Alipay and Wechat overseas.



Hiring spree ▪ German hypermarket operator Kaufland, a sister company of discounter Lidl, takes on Aldi in Australia, with job openings in Sydney, Melbourne, Adelaide and Brisbane. The retailer is currently advertising for more than 30 roles, including listings for area managers.



Little lift ▪ The extraordinary success of a promotion has regained Australian supermarket operator Coles a lead over arch-rival Woolworths, but it may not be able to retain its advantage. The so-called Little Shop collectables frenzy has added a remarkable AUD 200 million in extra sales.




Strange but true


Healthy fix ▪ Farmer’s Fridge wants people to stay fit when they are on the go. The Chicago-based start-up has retrofitted its 200 vending machines to serve up healthy foods. To ensure restaurant-quality, a chef receives feedback from customers to constantly tweak the menu. So far, it’s been working.



Green transport ▪ Uber is putting USD 10 million behind sustainable transportation over the next three years. As part of the fund, the ridesharing company is donating USD 250,000 to SharedStreets, a non-profit organization focused on creating a standard for public streets.