Ahold Delhaize makes moves at home and abroad, while Carrefour's five-year overhaul is going strong. Amazon scouts around in Mexico, Canada's brave new world sees its first hazy horizon, and Asia is going strong with digital partnerships. Meanwhile, things get strange as waste products are turned into perfume - have a nice ride.




Thursday, 18 October 2018





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Ahold Delhaize makes moves at home and abroad, while Carrefour's five-year overhaul is going strong. Amazon scouts around in Mexico, Canada's brave new world sees its first hazy horizon, and Asia is going strong with digital partnerships. Meanwhile, things get strange as waste products are turned into perfume - have a nice ride.




Europe


Changes ahead ▪ Swiss food giant Nestlé has announced the departure of its head of Asia. Wan Ling Martello had been tipped as a possible chief executive before the appointment of Mark Schneider two years ago. In the first nine month of the year, Nestlé reported an 2.8 per cent rise in like-for-like sales - in line with expectations.



Confident Carrefour ▪ French multinational retail group Carrefour is feeling secure amid its overhaul. It is currently on track to meet all targets by 2022, despite poorer performances in Spain and Italy with a long-term goal of partnering with Chinese e-retailer Tencent. This year’s third-quarter sales came to EUR 21.087 billion.



Smart strategy ▪ Dutch retail conglomerate Ahold Delhaize has re-vamped its online sector by unifying two of its biggest holdings, supermarket chain Albert Heijn and online service bol.com. Both platforms will also be employing Google Home services.



Prospect increase ▪ Apparently the warmer weather isn't bad for everything, as British online fashion label Asos experiences a leap in profits following the summer heat wave. Meanwhile, French sportswear brand Decathlon is looking to increase its number of stores in the Netherlands from 14 to 30, focusing on both inner city and outer locations.




USA and Canada


Amazon looks south ▪ Amazon eyes up it's fourth Mexican distribution centre, showing confidence in Mexico's potential as an outlet. In the US, Ebay is getting serious about its accusations that Amazon is poaching sellers from its system, and has filed a lawsuit in California.



Nutritious plans ▪ The US branch of Ahold Delhaize is phasing out artificial ingredients from its private-label products, with the supermarket and its battalion of private brands committed to creating a healthier service with transparent ingredients.



Delivery competition ▪ Postmates is expanding its service to 134 new cities, which means that the on-demand food delivery service now has a presence in 550 cities across the US. Postmates was most recently valued at USD 1.2 billion after a funding round last month.



Weed and wine ▪ New ventures launch this week, as Canada's legal Cannabis market gets a shaky start, with businesses having difficulty preparing and online retailers flooded with orders. Meanwhile US retailing company Kroger has soft-launched an online wine delivery service.




Asia


Digital directions ▪ Singaporean payment app NetsPay is looking to make an agreement with Tencent-owned WeChat, which would allow its users to make mobile payments in China. Hong Kong based conglomerate CK Hutchison and subsidiaries is joining hands with China's top online sharing platform Meitu to create an innovative new business design.



Shanghai saviour ▪ Historic but struggling French fashion label Carven has been bought by Shanghai based Icicle Fashion Group. Despite its long career the Carven brand was set to go bankrupt before being secured by the high-end Chinese retailer, which will be reviving the label.




Weird and...weirder


Beer concerns ▪ The rising global temperatures may hit us in areas we weren't expecting, as beer production is suspected to suffer, causing price inflation. Famously beer-loving Ireland may top the list of victims with a predicted 300% hike. Ouch.



Smells like trash ▪ Stranger still, this week brings news of a perfume made from rubbish. The luxury scent has been made using entirely recycled waste products, but despite its unlikely origins has a sophisticated smell, and is intended to promote the idea that elegance is recyclable.