The World Economic Forum held in Switzerland last week has sparked lots of developments for the retail world. In a rare move, soft-drink majors Pepsi and Coke teamed up to discuss transforming the plastics industry, Jack Ma issued a global war warning and concerns were raised over the human cost of poor food production practices. Have a great week and enjoy the read.




Monday, 28 January 2019





Hello ,

The World Economic Forum held in Switzerland last week has sparked lots of developments for the retail world. In a rare move, soft-drink majors Pepsi and Coke teamed up to discuss transforming the plastics industry, Jack Ma issued a global war warning and concerns were raised over the human cost of poor food production practices. Have a great week and enjoy the read.




Europe


Job cuts ▪ Weak sales over the Christmas period are to blame for German retail chain Kaufhof’s decision to axe 2600 jobs. British grocer Tesco’s embracing of technology could also see 15,000 fresh food counter jobs cut as the company is rumoured to be replacing staff with vending machines.



Global stage ▪ At the World Economic Forum, arch rivals Coca-Cola and Pepsi appeared jointly as part of a panel discussing the future of plastics. Meanwhile, a report was also unveiled at the forum highlighting how ‘unhealthy’ food production methods could cause five million deaths annually by 2050.



Discounter decisions ▪ Lidl Italia is pairing up with Italian e-commerce service Supermercato24 to improve its e-grocery offerings with same-day delivery services. Meanwhile, rival Aldi has announced it is officially carbon neutral across its 900 UK and Irish stores.



Brexit woes ▪ French beauty giant L'Oréal is stock-piling its products in Britain in case of a no-deal Brexit come March. In Scotland, the Scotch Whisky Association is brainstorming how to manage European Union labelling laws, which are expected to create a significant extra cost if no deal is struck.




United States


Sales and software ▪ Amazon is crushing the e-commerce branding game, with a new study revealing 54% of significant American brands currently use the platform to sell and advertise. They predict that number will rise to 72% in the next five years. The online powerhouse is not doing as well with law enforcement, with its facial identification software seriously riddled with errors.



Strong quarter ▪ Starbucks is celebrating a better-than-expected holiday period, with same-store sales rising 4%, and its shares jumping 3% on the back of the news. While its competitors are rushing to produce cannabis-imbued beverages, the coffee major isn’t planning to jump on the bandwagon anytime soon.




Asia & Australasia


Shots fired ▪ Alibaba has come out swinging against America’s treatment of Chinese tech major Huawei, describing it as ‘very politically motivated’ and an attempt to thwart China's rise. Meanwhile at the World Economic Forum, Chinese billionaire Jack Ma warned that the technological revolution could spark another world war.



Unexpected sale ▪ In a move that has stunned industry insiders, Japan’s premium brewery Asahi has snapped up 174 year-old British beer major Fuller’s, including its historic Griffin Brewery, for GBP 250 million.



Trademark infringement ▪ Filipino fast-food chain Jollibee is suing a copycat outfit in China, JoyRulBee, who is attempting to imitate the branding, menu, store concept and name of the multinational chain.




Food for thought


Tables have turned ▪ The old paradigm of shopping as a female-dominated pursuit is being blown apart by a new report that reveals men are online shopping and visiting brick and mortar stores more than women. Check out how to cater to the ‘male power shopper’.



Insider insights ▪ Australia has all the hallmarks of a retail powerhouse, according to a recent report by Retail Gazette. Check out how retail Down Under compares with the United Kingdom and how well the country embraces international majors like Amazon and Aldi.