The importance of ethical practice has been highlighted in today’s issue, with global chocolate giants under fire for failing to make good on their promise to eradicate child-labour from their supply chains. Coca-Cola is also facing criticism for its link to a farm that violently mistreats animals. On a lighter note, check out the images of Aldi’s Shanghai opening. Enjoy the read.




Monday, 10 June 2019





Hello ,

The importance of ethical practice has been highlighted in today’s issue, with global chocolate giants under fire for failing to make good on their promise to eradicate child-labour from their supply chains. Coca-Cola is also facing criticism for its link to a farm that violently mistreats animals. On a lighter note, check out the images of Aldi’s Shanghai opening. Enjoy the read.




United States


Services and savings ▪ Walmart is jumping on the home delivery bandwagon with the announcement they will offer a 'direct to fridge' service for when customers aren't home. The retail powerhouse is also set to save USD 30 million with an incredibly tiny change – check out details here.



Bookshop deal ▪ Investment firm Elliot Management is set to acquire bookstore chain Barnes & Noble in a deal worth USD 683 million, including debt. The ailing bookseller has lost over USD 1 billion in market value over the past five years.



Delivery issues ▪ Express transportation leader FedEx has chosen to end its contract with Amazon as a strategic move to service other e-tailers. Meanwhile, the online giant, which accounted for less than 1.3% of the courier’s revenue last year, continues to grow its own delivery fleet of planes.



Ethical nightmares ▪ Covert footage has revealed the violent abuse of calves who are housed in appalling conditions at a Coca-Cola affiliated farm once deemed the ‘Disneyland of agricultural tourism’. Meanwhile, Hershey, Mars and Nestlé can’t guarantee their chocolate is child-labour free, making it highly likely a ‘chocolate bar bought in the US is the product of child labour’.




Asia & Australasia


Physical debut ▪ German discounter Aldi has officially opened its first two stores in Shanghai last Friday. Check out the pictures showcasing the in-store departments and storefront signage. The layout looks light, relaxed and more like a neighbourhood format.



Backing food ▪ Woolworths is getting behind the meal delivery industry with an AUS 30 million investment in local start-up Marley Spoon. The venture, which sees the Australian supermarket take a 9% stake, sent Marley Spoon’s shares skyrocketing by 68%.



Trade battles ▪ The on-going tariff war between the US and China is seeing big tech companies get caught in the middle, with the Chinese government warning tech leaders against complying with the Trump administration’s policies. Meanwhile, in Mexico, the threat of tariffs has been lifted after the border nation agreed to President Trump’s requests.




Europe


Social responsibility ▪ Germany’s Lidl is continuing to back a nutritional education programme that teaches school age children the value of eating well. In London, shopping centre Westfield has hosted Europe’s largest Eid festival – a Muslim celebration marking the end of Ramadan.



Green concerns ▪ Inspired by a recent seafood festival cancelled because of poor supply, environmental groups including Germany’s 'Deutsche Umwelthilfe’, are calling on politicians to legislate against over-fishing. Meanwhile, Sainsbury’s is becoming one of the first British supermarkets to get rid of loose produce plastic bags.



Fresh blood ▪ Iconic British department store John Lewis has chosen Sharon White as its new chairperson, becoming the first woman to take the helm in the company’s 155-year history. Meanwhile, Colm Dore has been appointed managing director of meat processor ABP’s pet food branch.




Social media


Snapping up products ▪ Visual social platform Snapchat is reportedly teaming up with big name ‘influencers’ including Kim Kardashian who will have in-app stores to promote products that users can swipe up to purchase.



Ikea tidbits ▪ The Swedish giant is making its catalogues on Pinterest shoppable to allow consumers to move faster from moments of inspiration to point-of-sale. And check out the guy who is paid to smash Ikea furniture.