Sainsbury's has opened a butcher store which doesn't sell meat. US grocer Kroger believes that sparkly ice cream will help it win market share, and a Kiwi company has introduced edible coffee cups. Meanwhile, Amazon's drones might do more than only deliver. Get inspired by these stories and read on to find out what else has happened in our industry.




Friday, 21 June 2019





Hello ,

Sainsbury's has opened a butcher store which doesn't sell meat. US grocer Kroger believes that sparkly ice cream will help it win market share, and a Kiwi company has introduced edible coffee cups. Meanwhile, Amazon's drones might do more than only deliver. Get inspired by these stories and read on to find out what else has happened in our industry.




The Americas


Guilty plea ▪ Walmart has agreed to settle charges by the US markets regulator that its Brazilian unit violated the Foreign Corrupt Practices Act, which makes it illegal for US corporations to bribe overseas officials. The guilty plea ended a huge investigation and leaves the retailer with a USD 282 million bill.



Growing opposition ▪ Apple, Keurig Dr Pepper and Dollar Tree have joined other companies in filing letters of opposition to President Trump's plan for more US tariffs on Chinese goods. Department store operator J.C. Penney and Macy’s urged not to include apparel and footwear as it would hurt consumers.



Sparkling performance ▪ Kroger bets on trendy house-brand products such as its Deluxe Unicorn Swirl ice cream to boost growth and win market share. Its own brand sales for the quarter rose by 3.3%. The supermarket major reported total company sales of USD 37.3 billion, more than analysts had expected.



Tech moves ▪ E-commerce platform Shopify has announced a number of enhancements to its shopping offerings, including a fulfilment network. Search engine Google is introducing new tools for local businesses in a bid to reach more customers across its platforms.




Europe


Pet deal ▪ JAB Holding continues to expand into the pet category. The Luxembourg-based investment firm has agreed to acquire National Veterinary Associates, one of the world’s largest pet and veterinary care services organisations, based in the US. JAB also has controlling stakes in Compassion-First Pet Hospitals.



Changing habits ▪ Dixons Carphone reported a 22% slump in profit to GBP 298 million, down from GBP 382 million the previous year. Britain’s biggest electrical and mobile phone retailer said that the mobile market was changing rapidly and the group had to move faster to respond.



Trademark battle ▪ German sportswear brand Adidas has lost its attempt to broaden the trademark protection for its three stripes. The European Union General Court has decided that the design was not 'distinctive enough'. This follows Adidas’ long-time disagreement with Belgian company Shoe Branding Europe.




Asia & Australasia


Surging sales ▪ Chinese e-commerce giants Alibaba and JD.com have enjoyed record-breaking results for the annual 6.18 shopping festival, which took place during the first 18 days of June. Both companies were benefitting from innovative marketing strategies and a rising demand for quality in smaller cities.



Eat a cup of coffee ▪ New Zealand-based online retailer Twiice has launched single-use coffee cups that are both biodegradable and edible. The product is made of a firm biscuit substance and reportedly tastes like cookies. The cup is baked in a way that sogginess is not a problem.




Thoughts for the weekend


Veggie hype ▪ The plant-based trend has reached a new high in Britain. Sainsbury's is trialling a meat-free butcher store. It's window showcases steaks made from soya and jackfruit quarter pounders. Not all shoppers are convinced, one claiming the mince looks like plastic kids' toy.



Eye in the sky ▪ Amazon has reportedly filed for a patent on “surveillance as a service” technology that would monitor customer homes from its delivery drones. The unmanned vehicles record and film as they pass. Anything suspicious would be photographed. Big Brother is watching!