There are some high-profile bids and takeovers that have caught our eye today. Germany’s Metro is likely to reject a bid from an investment group led by Czech billionaire Daniel Kretinsky, while French supermarket Carrefour is taking steps to exit the Chinese market by selling a majority stake of its operations in the country. Enjoy the read and have a great week.




Monday, 24 June 2019





Hello ,

There are some high-profile bids and takeovers that have caught our eye today. Germany’s Metro is likely to reject a bid from an investment group led by Czech billionaire Daniel Kretinsky, while French supermarket Carrefour is taking steps to exit the Chinese market by selling a majority stake of its operations in the country. Enjoy the read and have a great week.




Europe & Asia


Takeover offer ▪ Metro has been presented with a bid from Czech-Slovak group EP Global Commerce that would value the company at EUR 5.8 billion. However, the German wholesaler says the bid ‘substantially undervalues the company.’



Exit strategy ▪ Carrefour has sold 80% of its Chinese operations to e-commerce giant Suning for USD 669 million. The French retailer currently retains a 20% share, although there will be opportunities to sell if they decide to leave the market entirely. The deal must be approved by Chinese officials.



Trial extensions ▪ Aldi will expand its new urban ‘local store’ pilot to more London locations following the success of its initial trial in March. The German discounter also plans to increase its plastic free produce endeavour beyond its Scottish stores into England.



Caffeine hit ▪ The Co-operative has partnered with Churchill Catering to relaunch a limited number of coffee shops inside its stores. The idea is to create ‘community hubs’, sourcing local products and offering tailored menus. The first outlet will open in August.




Australasia & Africa


Laying foundations ▪ Retail giant Kaufland Australia has started with the construction of its AUD 255 million distribution centre in Victoria, which will create 600 new jobs in the area. In March, the hypermarket operator received approval of its first three stores.



Consumer needs ▪ New Zealand supermarket Countdown has teamed up with Spoon Guru, a British tech company that has overhauled the grocery chain’s online experience by allowing customers to filter over 30,000 products by dietary or lifestyle preference.



Coke in Africa ▪ Coca-Cola is making a USD 300 million investment in Ethiopia, building a new bottling plant that will likely create 500 new jobs. In Tanzania, the fizzy drink giant has finally closed its Zanzibar bottling factory, a decade after halting production.




United States


Tackling loss ▪ Walmart has invested in artificially intelligent security cameras which notify staff in real time when there is theft, scanning errors or fraud at the checkouts. The retail powerhouse is reportedly already using the tech in 1000 US stores, in an attempt to reduce an estimated USD 4 billion in ‘shrinkage’.



Openings and closures ▪ Embattled children’s retailer Toys R Us is set to open six small stores and establish an online presence this year, despite ceasing operations due to bankruptcy in 2018. Meanwhile, discounter Fred’s is closing a further 49 stores, and women’s retailer Dressbarn which has been around for 50 years has released its first round of what will ultimately be 650 store closures.




Marketing magic


Face time ▪ YouTube has jumped on board with augmented reality tech and has launched a program in conjunction with MAC Cosmetics that allows viewers to try on makeup virtually while they’re watching a video. Check out a clip of the AR in action here.



Early adopters ▪ Ever wondered exactly what influences social media influencers? It might not come as a huge surprise, with 69% of the trendsetters citing social media and particularly Instagram as their primary inspiration, while friends and family lagged way behind on a meagre 4%. Read more about the habits and psyche of influencers here.