The legal debacles faced by big-name retailers has grabbed our interest today. An Australian consumer watchdog is taking Samsung to court over misleading advertising, while Google is being challenged over its sluggish pace in removing distasteful and defamatory content. Supermarket giant Woolies has won proceedings over whether a product can be called biodegradable, even if it takes years to compost. Enjoy the read and have a great week!




Monday, 08 July 2019





Hello ,

The legal debacles faced by big-name retailers has grabbed our interest today. An Australian consumer watchdog is taking Samsung to court over misleading advertising, while Google is being challenged over its sluggish pace in removing distasteful and defamatory content. Supermarket giant Woolies has won proceedings over whether a product can be called biodegradable, even if it takes years to compost. Enjoy the read and have a great week!

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United States


Amazon developments ▪ The online giant’s deal with UK delivery company Deliveroo has been put on ice pending a full investigation by Britain’s competition watchdog. Meanwhile, Amazon-founder Jeff Bezos’ divorce has been finalised in court, with his former wife set to receive a USD 38.3 million settlement.



Hot stuff ▪ Spicy Sriracha sauce maker Huy Fong Foods has been made to pay USD 23.3 million to its jalapeno supplier Underwood Ranches. The two companies had worked together for 28 years before a bitter separation played out on social media and before the courts.




Europe


Team thinking ▪ Discount giant Aldi’s two arms, Aldi Nord and Aldi Süd, are set to merge their private labels with a new purchasing structure (paywall, in German). The alignment is expected to take place before the end of 2020 and will streamline the administration for own-brand suppliers.



Exciting format ▪ Pharmacy chain Boots has unveiled its new concept store in Covent Garden and has tongues wagging that future upgrades of Boots stores globally will take on a similar format. Check out the picture gallery here.



Store openings ▪ Food retailer Interspar has unveiled two new hypermarkets in Italy which showcase innovative features across the produce, butchery and deli departments. In Poland, grocery chain Dino Polska is bounding ahead with its expansion plans and has already opened 81 new stores in the last six months.



Green thinking ▪ Coop Switzerland has revealed an eco-friendly range of tableware made from palm leaves that will features in 900 stores. Meanwhile, read on about the debate between bottled and canned wine, and which is more sustainable.




Asia & Australasia


Building Down Under ▪ Kaufland has officially begun construction on its distribution centre in Victoria, Australia. The German discounter is expected to spend AUS 255 million on the facility, which will prioritise sustainability and have cutting edge automation.



Court battles ▪ Tech giant Samsung is heading to court to defend the Australian marketing of its Galaxy phones as waterproof, and then failing to fulfill warranty claims on water damaged devices. Woolworths has won a legal challenge over the branding of its biodegradable plates range and how long they take to break down into compost.



Murky waters ▪ Google is tackling legal proceedings for not removing defamatory reviews of a Sydney businessman. The landmark case will address mounting concerns around the legal responsibilities of online majors including YouTube and Facebook to remove offensive content. Meanwhile, an analyst predicts 'Judgement Day' is coming for the oligopoly over the tech industry.




Consumer trends


Social conversations ▪ London’s Westfield has unveiled The Trending Store, a unique pop-up that helps shoppers find out exactly what fashion is trending in real time, by using AI to track over 400,000 influencers on social media. Proceeds of the initiative are going to the Save the Children charity.



Mixing it up ▪ Want to engage more customers? Check your marketing. A new Australian study has shown that consumers prefer to engage with and purchase from brands that promote diversity and inclusiveness in their advertising. 21% of respondents have even gone so far as boycotting brands that don’t include diverse representation.