China’s coffee start-up Luckin expands at jaw-dropping speed and targets overseas markets for the first time. British grocer Iceland admits there is still a 'mountain to climb' after a failed trial to ban plastic packaging, and Amazon calls for higher minimum wages. Read on and find out what else is happening in the ever exiting retail industry!




Tuesday, 23 July 2019





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China’s coffee start-up Luckin expands at jaw-dropping speed and targets overseas markets for the first time. British grocer Iceland admits there is still a 'mountain to climb' after a failed trial to ban plastic packaging, and Amazon calls for higher minimum wages. Read on and find out what else is happening in the ever exiting retail industry!

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Europe


Under pressure ▪ In another move to reduce its high debts, French retailer Casino has agreed to sell its subsidiary Vindemia for EUR 219 million to GBH group, a leading retailer in the Indian Ocean region. Meanwhile, fellow grocer Leclerc is facing a fine in its home country over for 'abusive commercial practices'.



Competitive moves ▪ British grocer Sainsbury's is seeking a slice of the fast-growing food delivery market and has partnered with Deliveroo for a pizza delivery trial. As the pressure on UK supermarkets by discounters continues, market leader Tesco has announced to raise prices on more than 1,000 products.



Packaging worries ▪ After a failed trial and a 20% plunge in sales, frozen food retailer Iceland has reintroduced plastic packaging on its bananas. Managing Director Richard Walker admits that there is a lot of work to do on a plastic-free pledge, but says the company will keep experimenting.




The Americas


Expanding reach ▪ Vintage platform Etsy wants to add music gear marketplace Reverb to its portfolio and will pay USD 275 million to acquire the company. Meanwhile, German food business Dr Oetker is increasing its footprint in South America by buying Brazilian baking decoration firm Mavalério.



Robots and humans ▪ Amazon is opening a pair of new robotic shipping centres in Ohio, once more providing a collaborative workspace between human employees and it's growing army of shipping robots. In other news, the company has reiterated its call for a higher minimum wage in the US.



Ice cream dream ▪ Doughnut chain Krispy Kreme will debut with a new store design in North Carolina tomorrow, close to its headquarter. It features an expanded menu, with doughnut-infused ice cream in both milkshakes and scoop sandwiches, and is one of 45 stores that will open through 2020.




Asia


Coffee empires ▪ China's Luckin Coffee has joined forces with Americana Group, a major international food group, to push into India and the Middle East with its stores. Meanwhile, global rival Starbucks bets on technology and has teamed up with Brightloom for digital customer experience.



Nationwide rollout ▪ After testing the market for an 'alcopop' offering in Japan, Coca-Cola will begin shipping canned alcoholic drink Lemon-Do to supermarkets and convenience stores across the country. It is part of the company's attempt to diversify its way out of the crowded soda sector.



Connecting customers ▪ Australian supermarket leader Woolworth has launched media arm Cartology, designed in response to the changing retail landscape. It will leverage customer data to help suppliers to better engage with consumers along the path to purchase.




Ethical practice


Sustainability strides ▪ Three large American food retailers have pledged to do their part to save the planet. Wegmans will pilot the removal of single-use plastic bags, H-E-B is set to cut down refrigerant emissions, and Canada's Metro announced to offer a 30% discount on products nearing their expiration date.



Fashion for the disabled ▪ The number of US retailers launching affordable clothing lines for people with disabilities is growing. After debuts by Tommy Hilfiger and Target, department store operator Kohl's is the latest company to offer adaptive apparel for children with autism or sensory processing disorder.